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New Year Objectives

Despite ten years of abstinence I am curiously immune to the after effects of alcohol. While most of the house continue to sleep off the numerous bottles of wine consumed last night, I find myself awake and alert four hours after I went to bed. The perfect time to write about my goals for 2012.

The last twelve months has been a period of significant change: my first full year settled back home, growing a fledgling business and making a fatal error when it comes to triathlon training – starting a relationship. The latter has been responsible for my developing fondness for wine, particularly red. My life has broadened from the narrow, Ironman focus of previous years, naturally my objectives match this and while a significant number relate to training and racing, an equally important portion don’t.

I review each year in light of my previous objectives; 2011 is the first time I failed to meet my sporting goals. Even the less specific, unmeasurable ones – how do you define rebuilding your run? What ever that meant to me at the beginning of last year I am quite certain I didn’t achieve it. I’ve dwelt on that before and I want to look forward. I’m nervous of setting specific goals for the year; after falling short, measurability scares me. I have also reached a stage, perhaps driven by a frustrating season, where I question my motivations as much as my goals. I know I’ve said this before, but in terms of triathlon I simply want to enjoy my sport.

Also I would like the run performance from the peak of 2010 at the same time as the bike fitness from the peak of 2011!

My coaching business is successful. My stable of athletes remains full with a small amount of turn over throughout the season; it’s a reassuring position to be in. I consider myself a smarter coach now than I was a year ago, a core objective for the year ahead is to continue to learn, refine and improve. But I also want to achieve more with my business, work better with my athletes and find new ways in which I can work with others. Developing the coaching consultancy idea into something concrete would be a start and I ponder the possibility of offering bespoke plans for longer periods without the ongoing support, a halfway point between the expense of a coach and the broad brush of a training manual. More thought is needed, business objectives will have its own list in its own time.

One new branch is my involvement in running a training camp – joining Steven Lord in the Pyrenees in late June to deliver an experienced inspired by our time at Epic Camp.

Sport, business, leading finally to life. Balance is the objective, dividing time between triathlon and the other things that interest me. I have been obsessive and blinkered for the last few years and it’s time for some change. Remarkable as it seems I do have other interests – art, cooking, apparently wine! I can’t recall when I last visited a gallery or exhibition, and despite the enjoyment it brings me I bake infrequently. At least the recent purchase of a Kindle has already ended the drought in reading. It’s good to have other areas to explore.

What about Kona? I think my two year plan may have become three. Pragmatism plays it’s part, with such a busy year ahead, were I to qualify I doubt I could afford to go. Wales may provide a first chance for 2013.

Finally. Better time management. That’s probably the most important objective of all.

Comments

  • Good luck for 2012 Russ, sounds like life is going in an interesting direction for you, and I hope your fitness reaches former heights.

    My plan is to learn to cope with an entirely new climate – completing a triathlon will suffice for now.

  • Hi Will

    I saw on your blog you’ve moved to the other side of the world, quite a surprise! Where about are you living down there? Personally I loved training in the Aussie heat, the Gold Coast was one of my favourite training venues. I’m sure you can put the work in to get yourself back in shape and competing at Tris down under.

    Russ

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